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  • Miracles and muddy shoes

    In Exodus 14:15-16 the Lord speaks to Moses in the midst of a terrifying scene: Having escaped from Egypt, the Hebrew refugees find themselves trapped on the shore of the Red Sea: an expanse of water on one side and, on the other, Egyptian chariots in pursuit with murderous intent. In their terror the people cry out to the Lord, and even accuse Moses of leading them to their deaths (v.11). Now, in verses 15-16, God intervenes... Then the Lord said to Moses, “Why do you cry out to me? Tell the Israelites to go forward. But you lift up your rod, and hold out your arm over the sea and split it, so that the Israelites may march into the sea on dry ground.” (Exodus14:15-16) The sages of Israel, so attuned to the subtleties of the biblical text, noticed something odd about these two verses. Before reading on, see if you can spot it for yourself... Wouldn’t you expect God to command Moses to split the sea before telling the Israelites to go forward into it? Yet, the text has the order of the two steps reversed. What can be made of this? According to one creative interpretation: some of the Israelites lacked faith at the edge of the sea. Yet God asks that they show their faith by marching into the sea even before the waters have parted. Some commentators suggest a back-and-forth discussion among the tribes of Israelites, which we might paraphrase like this: “I’m not going first into the sea; you go.” “No way, I’m not going, you go first!” By contrast, another creative version has the tribes competing for the privilege of being the first to take the plunge, which we might paraphrase as: “I’ll go first.” “No, I want to be first!” How do you imagine the scene? Can you relate it to a moment in your own life when you were called to ‘take the plunge’ in an unknown and potentially perilous situation? How did you feel, react, behave? Did you ‘go first’? Can you think of a time when you were called to ‘take the plunge’ in an unknown and potentially perilous situation? Another midrash (interpretative story) takes an even stronger view, saying that the people were doubly rebellious at the sea. Why double? Psalm 106:7 contains a repetition [evident in the Hebrew text]: But [they] rebelled at the sea, at the Sea of Reeds. If the first moment of rebellion was the hesitation to go forward into the water, what was the second? The second, say some commentators, was to complain about the mud as they were walking through the parted waters! This interpretation relies on the use of the Hebrew word for mud (homer) found in Habakkuk (3:15). The Jewish interpreters of old knew their Scriptures intimately and manoeuvred through the texts freely, creatively, insightfully and prayerfully. In this way they came to conclude: miracles in themselves don’t bring people to faith. (It would appear that Jesus himself shared this view, reluctant to be labelled as a wonder-worker.) Like the Israelites’ petty grumblings amidst the miracle of the Red Sea, so can we be blind to the divine presence in our lives, held back by our fears or distracted by the ‘mud on our shoes.’ The attitude of ‘counting blessings,’ making ‘gratitude lists’ and practicing affirmation as a lifestyle behaviour are all ways to attune our hearts and minds to God’s liberating presence. Review your own practices in this light. Are you quick to notice blessings or burdens? Are you more likely to praise or complain? • Bibliography: Bialik & Ravnitzky, eds., The Book of Legends (New York, 1992); Leibowitz, New Studies in Shemot (Jerusalem, 1996). Scripture: JPS. © Teresa Pirola, 2013. lightoftorah.net. Reproduction for non-commercial use permitted with acknowledgement of the Light of Torah website. Light of Torah is a grassroots ministry based in the Catholic community in Australia, encouraging Christians to reflect on Torah with the help of Jewish insights. More... The reflection above refers to Parashat B'shalach (Exodus 13:17 - 17:16), the Torah portion read for this Sabbath in the Jewish liturgical cycle. Shabbat shalom! Download your free Jewish and Christian Liturgical Calendar, courtesy of Etz Hayim-Tree of Life Publishing.

  • The light that leads to ‘Bethlehem in Judea’

    The Christian festival of the Epiphany, in the West, primarily celebrates Christ’s ‘manifestation’ to the Gentiles as depicted in the biblical story of the Magi. [1] In Matthew’s Gospel (2:1-12) the Magi embark upon a journey seeking the ‘infant king of the Jews’. They are foreigners 'from the east' (2:1) amidst a story awash with Jewish characters, symbols, texts. For example, the Magi are led to Jerusalem, the cultic centre of Jewish life. Navigating a dangerous encounter with King Herod, their enquiry takes them to Bethlehem (about 8km south of Jerusalem). These directions come via the Jewish priests and scribes who know that, according to a prophetic tradition of Israel,[2] the messianic child is to be born ‘in Bethlehem in Judea’. Bethlehem is the birthplace of King David (1 Samuel 16:4). And Judea was the focus of a number of messianic prophecies circulating in the ancient world. At Bethlehem the Magi find a little family of Jews: ‘the child with his mother Mary’. Interpreted through the lens of the Hebrew Scriptures, reference to ‘gifts of gold and frankincense and myrrh’ perhaps alludes to Isaiah 60:6 which speaks of God exalting over a renewed Jerusalem and the (gentile) nations being drawn to its light. The guiding star can be interpreted as a symbol of the emergence of the dynasty of King David.[3] In the Catechism of the Catholic Church (n. 528) we read: The magi's coming to Jerusalem in order to pay homage to the king of the Jews shows that they seek in Israel, in the messianic light of the star of David, the one who will be king of the nations. Their coming means that pagans can discover Jesus and worship him as Son of God and Saviour of the world only by turning towards the Jews and receiving from them the messianic promise as contained in the Old Testament. [4] This text is notable for the way it places the story of Israel front and centre. Attuned to the Second Vatican Council's renewal of Catholic teaching on the Church's relationship to Judaism, it presents the story of the Magi in a manner that implies an ongoing challenge for gentile Christians: to be awake to what God has done, and is doing, through the Jewish people. Cardinal Jean Marie Lustiger [5] once wrote: Pagans, even when they become Christians, are constantly tempted to refuse the particularity of history and divine election. They are tempted to make Jesus the projection of the ideal man that each culture and civilisation creates within itself. . . . Christ himself, the figure of Christ in its reality, can assume every face of humanity, but that can happen only because he is first of all the individual who was born in Bethlehem of Judea. [6] The scriptural reading of the story of the Magi proclaims Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world; and it also reminds us that this universal gift comes into the world by way of a particular people—their story, history, sacred texts, land. For the Christ-child adored by the Magi is a Jewish child, born 'in Bethlehem in Judea' (Mt 2:5); and ‘the special position of Israel’[7] in salvation history continues to hold and shine forth for all times. [8] In a Christmas reflection affirming the pivotal role of Judaism and its continuing light to the world, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI) wrote: Abraham, father of the people of Israel, father of faith, thus becomes the source of blessing, for in him ‘all the families of the earth shall call themselves blessed’ (Genesis 12:3). The task of the Chosen People is, therefore, to make a gift of their God — the one true God — to every other people; in reality, as Christians we are the inheritors of their faith in the one God. Our gratitude, therefore, must be extended to our Jewish brothers and sisters who, despite the hardships of their own history, have held on to faith in this God right up to the present, and who witness to it . . .[9] In our struggle to fully grasp of the mystery of the Incarnation, we gentile Christians are, in a sense, still journeying to that place where Christ was born. We are still enquiring, still exploring, still ‘searching into’ the Church’s mystery as we grow in understanding of our irrevocable ties to Judaism and our indebtedness to the Jewish people. For, as the Second Vatican Council declared, ‘theirs is the sonship and the glory and the covenants and the law and the worship and the promises; theirs are the fathers and from them is the Christ according to the flesh’ (Rom. 9:4-5), the Son of the Virgin Mary.[10] Notes: [1] In the East, where this ancient feast originated, the focus is primarily the theophany at the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan. The miracle at the wedding feast of Cana is also associated with Epiphany. [2] The name ‘Israel’ has multiple meanings. In this article it is a theological reference to the Jewish people, from their origins in history to their ultimate destiny in accord with God’s design. [3] With reference to Numbers 24:17: ‘a star shall come out of Jacob, and a sceptre shall rise out of Israel’ - a messianic text in Jewish thought. [4] Emphasis added. On the significance of this text for Christian identity and interfaith relations, see Achim Buckenmaier, ‘Not Just Any Child, But That Special Child’, Jewish-Christian Relations: Insights and Issues in the Ongoing Jewish-Christian Dialogue, 30 April 2016, accessed at the website of the International Council of Christians and Jews, https://www.jcrelations.net/articles/article/not-just-any-child-but-that-special-child.html [5] French Cardinal, 1926-2007, Jewish by birth. [6] J.M. Lustiger, Choosing God – Chosen by God (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1991), 64. Quoted in Achim Buckenmaier, ‘Not Just Any Child’. [7] See Joseph Ratzinger, Israel, the Church, and the World, in Catholic International 5 (1994), 309-314, quoted in Achim Buckenmaier, ‘Not Just Any Child’. [8] This statement (and this article) is framed by Christian credal convictions. Some elements (e.g., the historical fact of Jesus’ Jewish identity) find common ground with Judaism. Belief in the messianic identity and divinity of Jesus is a clear point of departure between the two religions. [9] Joseph Ratzinger, ‘The Heritage of Abraham: the Gift of Christmas’, L'Osservatore Romano (c. December 2000), accessed at the Dialogika online library maintained by the Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations and the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations of Saint Joseph's University, Philadelphia. [10] Vatican II, Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions, Nostra Aetate, 28 October 1965, 4. © Teresa Pirola, 2021. lightoftorah.net Reproduction for non-commercial use permitted with acknowledgment of website. Download the PDF version.

  • The Child in the Manger is a Jewish Child

    'Whoever meets Jesus Christ, meets Judaism' (St John Paul II) [1] Indeed, Christian remembrance of the nativity of Jesus is always an encounter with Judaism - historically, biblically, theologically. That may not be apparent at first glance, given the significant credal differences that distinguish Judaism from the Christian proclamation that the child born in Bethlehem is the promised messiah, the saviour of the world. These disparities in belief must be respected, of course. Still, the child in the manger is a Jewish child. And the season of Christmas is filled with opportunities for Christians to grow in appreciation of the Jewish identity of Jesus and the Jewish roots of the Church, and to reflect on the vitality of Jewish covenantal life in the world, both then (at the time of Jesus’ birth) and now. Four reflections come to mind: 1. Salvation is relational The birth of Jesus is a family affair. Jesus is born to a daughter of Israel, raised in a Jewish family faithful to ancestral traditions. He is ‘born under the law’ (Gal 4:4), that is, the Mosaic law, and circumcised on the eighth day (Lk 2:21). While unique in his divine sonship, Jesus is presented in Scripture as deeply ‘familied’ as a descendant of Abraham, a son of Israel, a son of David, son of Mary, Son of God. 2. ‘For salvation is from the Jews’ (Jn 4:22) The story of Jesus’s birth has a powerful ‘back story’. Jesus did not appear out of the blue ‘like a meteor that falls by chance to the earth and is devoid of any connection with human history’.[2] Rather, his coming is framed by the long history of the people of Israel; the Christmas story engages the story of salvation in its entirety, the Hebrew Scriptures as much as the New Testament. Thus did Jesus become ‘an authentic son of Israel.’ [3] This point is beautifully captured in Matthew’s Gospel with the genealogy of Jesus preceding the nativity story. 3. Salvation is enfleshed The mystery of the Incarnation resists any temptation to reduce the message of Christmas to an idea, a principle, a value, an ethic, a philosophy, when at heart it is about a person. 'The Word became flesh and lived among us’ (Jn 1:14) not as an abstract genre (‘humankind’) or as a ‘neutral’ human being; rather, the Word 'became Jewish flesh, a Jew, the son of a Jewish mother, and as such a concrete human being. Becoming human happened in becoming a Jew.’ [4] And to be a Jew is to belong to the Jewish people. When Christians liturgically remember the birth of Christ at Christmas, then, they encounter God’s love for and presence among the Jewish people. It is from this people, in this place and time in history, that the message of salvation goes out to the whole world and to all peoples. 4. Salvation continues to unfold Jesus is born, Christ has come. Halleluyah! And Jesus continues to be ‘born’ into our hearts and lives, as his saving work gradually unfurls in history. As Christians we commit ourselves to living the Christmas message of peace of earth, even as we look expectantly towards that future Day when Christ will come again, bringing all things to completion. We also know that God continues to covenant with the Jewish people, who offer a distinctive Jewish witness to the word of God, which is lifegiving to the world, as the reign of God unfolds on earth. In this way, Jews and Christians together participate in God’s saving activity in the present, and they share messianic hope, albeit understood in different ways. Christmas: a time to ‘search into’ the mystery Speaking of the Church’s permanent link to Judaism, Pope John Paul II had this to say during his historic visit to the Synagogue of Rome in 1986: The Church of Christ discovers her ‘bond’ with Judaism by ‘searching into her own mystery.’ The Jewish religion is not ‘extrinsic’ to us, but in a certain way is ‘intrinsic’ to our own religion. With Judaism, therefore, we have a relationship which we do not have with any other religion. The Christmas season is a time for Christians to ponder and ‘search into’ this mystery and to discover their ‘bond’ with Judaism. To find God in a Jewish infant, born into a Jewish community that knew (and knows) itself to be irrevocably loved and called by the God of Israel, is not an incidental curiosity to the Christmas story. It is its beating heart. • Footnotes [1] John Paul II, Address to the West German Jewish Community, Mainz, 17 November 1980. [2] John Paul II, Address to the Pontifical Biblical Commission, 11 April 1997. [3] John Paul II, Address to the Pontifical Biblical Commission, 11 April 1997. [4] Hans Herman Henrix, ‘The Son of God Became Human as a Jew. Implications of the Jewishness of Jesus for Christology’ in Christ Jesus and the Jewish People Today. New Explorations of Theological Interrelationships, ed. Philip A. Cunningham et al (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2011), 114-143, at 119. © Teresa Pirola, 2021. lightoftorah.net Reproduction for non-commercial use permitted with acknowledgment of website. Find the downloadable PDF version here.

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  • I am a title 02

    jewish calendar 2022 PDF version Christian & Jewish liturgical calendar JEWISH CALENDAR 2022 Festivals and other dates of note ​ Sunset 16 January 2022 to nightfall 17 January 2022: Tu B’Shvat (‘New Year of Trees’). It has developed into an ecological holiday that reminds Jews of our connection to the earth and to our role as caretakers of the environment. Some modern practices include donating money to plant trees in Israel or planting trees locally. More… 2 7 January 2022 International Holocaust Remembrance Day . Commemorates the liberation of the Auschwitz extermination camp complex by Soviet troops on this date in the secular calendar in 1945. More… ​ Dawn to dusk 16 March 2022: Fast of Esther. Commemorates the three-day fast called at Esther's behest before she risked her life to appear unsummoned before her husband King Ahasuerus , head of the Achaemenid Persian Empire , in order to save the Jewish people from Haman's evil decree (see next item – Purim). More… Sunset 16 March 2022 to nightfall 17 March 2022: Purim . Commemorates the saving of the Jewish people from Haman , the royal vizier to King Ahasuerus . Haman was planning to kill all the Jews, as recounted in the Book of Esther , which is recited on the occasion. More… Sunset 15 April 2022 to nightfall 12 April 2022: Pesach (Passover ). A pilgrimage festival - commemorates the salvation of the Israelites from the Angel of Death during the tenth plague visited upon the Egyptians, and the Israelite departure from Egypt. Many of the themes of the Christian Easter are derived from those of Pesach. More… Sunset 26 April 2022 to nightfall 27 April 2022: Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day). Commemorates the lives and heroism of Jewish people who died in the Holocaust between 1933 and 1945. More… 8:00pm 3 May 2022 to sundown 4 May 2022: Yom HaZikaron (Israeli Memorial Day) . Commemorates all the soldiers and people who lost their lives during the struggle to establish and defend the State of Israel. More… ​ Sundown 4 May 2022 to nightfall 5 May 2022: Yom HaAtzmaut (Israeli Independence Day) . Commemorates the re-establishment of the Jewish commonwealth in Israel in 1948 after an interval of more than 1800 years. More… Sundown 28 May 2022 to nightfall 29 May 2022: Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Day) . Commemorates the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967 after 19 years of division, and the restoration of all of Jerusalem to complete Jewish sovereignty after an interval of almost 1900 years. More… Sundown 4 June 2022 to nightfall 6 June 2022: Shavuot . A pilgrimage festival. It marks the end of the counting of 50 days from the start of Passover, traditionally the time of the wheat harvest in Biblical Israel. Shavuot is sometimes called the Jewish Pentecost. The word Pentecost here refers to the count of fifty days after Passover. The Christian festival of Pentecost also has its origins in Shavuot. More… Sundown 6 August 2022 to nightfall 7 August 2022: Tisha B’Av (9th day of the Hebrew month of Av). A fast day. The fast commemorates the destruction of both the First Temple and Second Temple in Jerusalem, which occurred about 655 years apart, but on the same Hebrew calendar date. Tisha B'Av is never observed on Shabbat. If the 9th of Av falls on a Saturday, the fast is postponed until the 10th of Av. More… Sundown 11 August 2022 to nightfall 12 August 2022: Tu B’Av . A minor holiday. In the days of the Temple in Jerusalem , it marked the beginning of the grape harvest. Considered an auspicious time for weddings. More… Sundown 25 September 2022 to nightfall 27 September 2022: Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year). A solemn occasion marking the beginning of the 10 days of repentance, and the beginning of the Jewish high Holyday season. More… Dawn to dusk 28 September 2022: Fast of Gedaliah . Laments the assassination of the righteous governor of Judah of that name, which ended Jewish rule following the destruction of the First Temple. More… Sundown 4 October 2022 to nightfall 5 October 2022: Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) . A day of fasting and prayer, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar. Marks the end of the 10 days of repentance. More… Sundown 9 October 2022 to nightfall 16 October 2022: Succot. The Feast of Tabernacles , or the Feast of Booths (huts). A pilgrimage festival. It commemorates the 40 years spent by the Israelites living in makeshift dwellings in the wilderness on their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land of Israel. More… Sundown 16 October 2022 to nightfall 17 October 2022: Shemini Atzeret (A day for assembly, or pause). The Hebrew word atzeret is generally translated as "assembly", but shares a linguistic root with the word atzor, meaning "stop" or "tarry". Shemini Atzeret is characterized as a day when the Jewish people "tarries" to spend an additional day with God at the end of Sukkot. More… Sundown 17 October 2022 to nightfall 18 October 2022: Simchat Torah (Rejoicing in the Torah) . Marks the end of the Jewish High Holyday season, and the completion of the annual cycle of reading from the 5 Books of Moses. A joyous festival. More… 9 November 2021: Kristallnacht (‘The Night of Broken Glass’) . The beginning of a State-sanctioned pogrom against the Jews of Germany and Austria in 1938. Considered by many as the beginning of the Nazi genocide against European Jewry. More… ​ 29 November 2021 remembers the date on the secular calendar in 1947 when the UN General Assembly voted in favor of the partition of the Holy Land into a Jewish State and an Arab State. More… 30 November 2021 . On this date Israel and the Jewish world remembers the fate of more than 850,000 Jews who were forced out of Arab countries and Iran in the 20th century. More… Sundown 18 December 2022 to nightfall 26 December 2022: Hanukah (Festival of Lights). It commemorates the re-dedication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire. More…

  • I am a title 01

    jewish calendar 2022 PDF version Christian & Jewish liturgical calendar JEWISH CALENDAR 2022 Festivals and other dates of note ​ Sunset 16 January 2022 to nightfall 17 January 2022: Tu B’Shvat (‘New Year of Trees’). It has developed into an ecological holiday that reminds Jews of our connection to the earth and to our role as caretakers of the environment. Some modern practices include donating money to plant trees in Israel or planting trees locally. More… 2 7 January 2022 International Holocaust Remembrance Day . Commemorates the liberation of the Auschwitz extermination camp complex by Soviet troops on this date in the secular calendar in 1945. More… ​ Dawn to dusk 16 March 2022: Fast of Esther. Commemorates the three-day fast called at Esther's behest before she risked her life to appear unsummoned before her husband King Ahasuerus , head of the Achaemenid Persian Empire , in order to save the Jewish people from Haman's evil decree (see next item – Purim). More… Sunset 16 March 2022 to nightfall 17 March 2022: Purim . Commemorates the saving of the Jewish people from Haman , the royal vizier to King Ahasuerus . Haman was planning to kill all the Jews, as recounted in the Book of Esther , which is recited on the occasion. More… Sunset 15 April 2022 to nightfall 12 April 2022: Pesach (Passover ). A pilgrimage festival - commemorates the salvation of the Israelites from the Angel of Death during the tenth plague visited upon the Egyptians, and the Israelite departure from Egypt. Many of the themes of the Christian Easter are derived from those of Pesach. More… Sunset 26 April 2022 to nightfall 27 April 2022: Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day). Commemorates the lives and heroism of Jewish people who died in the Holocaust between 1933 and 1945. More… 8:00pm 3 May 2022 to sundown 4 May 2022: Yom HaZikaron (Israeli Memorial Day) . Commemorates all the soldiers and people who lost their lives during the struggle to establish and defend the State of Israel. More… ​ Sundown 4 May 2022 to nightfall 5 May 2022: Yom HaAtzmaut (Israeli Independence Day) . Commemorates the re-establishment of the Jewish commonwealth in Israel in 1948 after an interval of more than 1800 years. More… Sundown 28 May 2022 to nightfall 29 May 2022: Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Day) . Commemorates the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967 after 19 years of division, and the restoration of all of Jerusalem to complete Jewish sovereignty after an interval of almost 1900 years. More… Sundown 4 June 2022 to nightfall 6 June 2022: Shavuot . A pilgrimage festival. It marks the end of the counting of 50 days from the start of Passover, traditionally the time of the wheat harvest in Biblical Israel. Shavuot is sometimes called the Jewish Pentecost. The word Pentecost here refers to the count of fifty days after Passover. The Christian festival of Pentecost also has its origins in Shavuot. More… Sundown 6 August 2022 to nightfall 7 August 2022: Tisha B’Av (9th day of the Hebrew month of Av). A fast day. The fast commemorates the destruction of both the First Temple and Second Temple in Jerusalem, which occurred about 655 years apart, but on the same Hebrew calendar date. Tisha B'Av is never observed on Shabbat. If the 9th of Av falls on a Saturday, the fast is postponed until the 10th of Av. More… Sundown 11 August 2022 to nightfall 12 August 2022: Tu B’Av . A minor holiday. In the days of the Temple in Jerusalem , it marked the beginning of the grape harvest. Considered an auspicious time for weddings. More… Sundown 25 September 2022 to nightfall 27 September 2022: Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year). A solemn occasion marking the beginning of the 10 days of repentance, and the beginning of the Jewish high Holyday season. More… Dawn to dusk 28 September 2022: Fast of Gedaliah . Laments the assassination of the righteous governor of Judah of that name, which ended Jewish rule following the destruction of the First Temple. More… Sundown 4 October 2022 to nightfall 5 October 2022: Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) . A day of fasting and prayer, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar. Marks the end of the 10 days of repentance. More… Sundown 9 October 2022 to nightfall 16 October 2022: Succot. The Feast of Tabernacles , or the Feast of Booths (huts). A pilgrimage festival. It commemorates the 40 years spent by the Israelites living in makeshift dwellings in the wilderness on their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land of Israel. More… Sundown 16 October 2022 to nightfall 17 October 2022: Shemini Atzeret (A day for assembly, or pause). The Hebrew word atzeret is generally translated as "assembly", but shares a linguistic root with the word atzor, meaning "stop" or "tarry". Shemini Atzeret is characterized as a day when the Jewish people "tarries" to spend an additional day with God at the end of Sukkot. More… Sundown 17 October 2022 to nightfall 18 October 2022: Simchat Torah (Rejoicing in the Torah) . Marks the end of the Jewish High Holyday season, and the completion of the annual cycle of reading from the 5 Books of Moses. A joyous festival. More… 9 November 2021: Kristallnacht (‘The Night of Broken Glass’) . The beginning of a State-sanctioned pogrom against the Jews of Germany and Austria in 1938. Considered by many as the beginning of the Nazi genocide against European Jewry. More… ​ 29 November 2021 remembers the date on the secular calendar in 1947 when the UN General Assembly voted in favor of the partition of the Holy Land into a Jewish State and an Arab State. More… 30 November 2021 . On this date Israel and the Jewish world remembers the fate of more than 850,000 Jews who were forced out of Arab countries and Iran in the 20th century. More… Sundown 18 December 2022 to nightfall 26 December 2022: Hanukah (Festival of Lights). It commemorates the re-dedication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire. More…

  • Sukkot

    jewish calendar 2022 PDF version Christian & Jewish liturgical calendar JEWISH CALENDAR 2022 Festivals and other dates of note ​ Sunset 16 January 2022 to nightfall 17 January 2022: Tu B’Shvat (‘New Year of Trees’). It has developed into an ecological holiday that reminds Jews of our connection to the earth and to our role as caretakers of the environment. Some modern practices include donating money to plant trees in Israel or planting trees locally. More… 2 7 January 2022 International Holocaust Remembrance Day . Commemorates the liberation of the Auschwitz extermination camp complex by Soviet troops on this date in the secular calendar in 1945. More… ​ Dawn to dusk 16 March 2022: Fast of Esther. Commemorates the three-day fast called at Esther's behest before she risked her life to appear unsummoned before her husband King Ahasuerus , head of the Achaemenid Persian Empire , in order to save the Jewish people from Haman's evil decree (see next item – Purim). More… Sunset 16 March 2022 to nightfall 17 March 2022: Purim . Commemorates the saving of the Jewish people from Haman , the royal vizier to King Ahasuerus . Haman was planning to kill all the Jews, as recounted in the Book of Esther , which is recited on the occasion. More… Sunset 15 April 2022 to nightfall 12 April 2022: Pesach (Passover ). A pilgrimage festival - commemorates the salvation of the Israelites from the Angel of Death during the tenth plague visited upon the Egyptians, and the Israelite departure from Egypt. Many of the themes of the Christian Easter are derived from those of Pesach. More… Sunset 26 April 2022 to nightfall 27 April 2022: Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day). Commemorates the lives and heroism of Jewish people who died in the Holocaust between 1933 and 1945. More… 8:00pm 3 May 2022 to sundown 4 May 2022: Yom HaZikaron (Israeli Memorial Day) . Commemorates all the soldiers and people who lost their lives during the struggle to establish and defend the State of Israel. More… ​ Sundown 4 May 2022 to nightfall 5 May 2022: Yom HaAtzmaut (Israeli Independence Day) . Commemorates the re-establishment of the Jewish commonwealth in Israel in 1948 after an interval of more than 1800 years. More… Sundown 28 May 2022 to nightfall 29 May 2022: Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Day) . Commemorates the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967 after 19 years of division, and the restoration of all of Jerusalem to complete Jewish sovereignty after an interval of almost 1900 years. More… Sundown 4 June 2022 to nightfall 6 June 2022: Shavuot . A pilgrimage festival. It marks the end of the counting of 50 days from the start of Passover, traditionally the time of the wheat harvest in Biblical Israel. Shavuot is sometimes called the Jewish Pentecost. The word Pentecost here refers to the count of fifty days after Passover. The Christian festival of Pentecost also has its origins in Shavuot. More… Sundown 6 August 2022 to nightfall 7 August 2022: Tisha B’Av (9th day of the Hebrew month of Av). A fast day. The fast commemorates the destruction of both the First Temple and Second Temple in Jerusalem, which occurred about 655 years apart, but on the same Hebrew calendar date. Tisha B'Av is never observed on Shabbat. If the 9th of Av falls on a Saturday, the fast is postponed until the 10th of Av. More… Sundown 11 August 2022 to nightfall 12 August 2022: Tu B’Av . A minor holiday. In the days of the Temple in Jerusalem , it marked the beginning of the grape harvest. Considered an auspicious time for weddings. More… Sundown 25 September 2022 to nightfall 27 September 2022: Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year). A solemn occasion marking the beginning of the 10 days of repentance, and the beginning of the Jewish high Holyday season. More… Dawn to dusk 28 September 2022: Fast of Gedaliah . Laments the assassination of the righteous governor of Judah of that name, which ended Jewish rule following the destruction of the First Temple. More… Sundown 4 October 2022 to nightfall 5 October 2022: Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) . A day of fasting and prayer, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar. Marks the end of the 10 days of repentance. More… Sundown 9 October 2022 to nightfall 16 October 2022: Succot. The Feast of Tabernacles , or the Feast of Booths (huts). A pilgrimage festival. It commemorates the 40 years spent by the Israelites living in makeshift dwellings in the wilderness on their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land of Israel. More… Sundown 16 October 2022 to nightfall 17 October 2022: Shemini Atzeret (A day for assembly, or pause). The Hebrew word atzeret is generally translated as "assembly", but shares a linguistic root with the word atzor, meaning "stop" or "tarry". Shemini Atzeret is characterized as a day when the Jewish people "tarries" to spend an additional day with God at the end of Sukkot. More… Sundown 17 October 2022 to nightfall 18 October 2022: Simchat Torah (Rejoicing in the Torah) . Marks the end of the Jewish High Holyday season, and the completion of the annual cycle of reading from the 5 Books of Moses. A joyous festival. More… 9 November 2021: Kristallnacht (‘The Night of Broken Glass’) . The beginning of a State-sanctioned pogrom against the Jews of Germany and Austria in 1938. Considered by many as the beginning of the Nazi genocide against European Jewry. More… ​ 29 November 2021 remembers the date on the secular calendar in 1947 when the UN General Assembly voted in favor of the partition of the Holy Land into a Jewish State and an Arab State. More… 30 November 2021 . On this date Israel and the Jewish world remembers the fate of more than 850,000 Jews who were forced out of Arab countries and Iran in the 20th century. More… Sundown 18 December 2022 to nightfall 26 December 2022: Hanukah (Festival of Lights). It commemorates the re-dedication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire. More…

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